NM at Center of Obama's Climate-Change Proposal

Oil Drilling

January 22, 2015 - Troy Wilde, Public News Service (NM)

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FARMINGTON, N.M. – New Mexico may be among the states most impacted by President Barack Obama's effort to regulate and reduce methane gas emissions.

Mike Eisenfeld, New Mexico energy coordinator for the advocacy group San Juan Citizens Alliance, says NASA released a report last year that shows the Four Corners region is a hot spot, responsible for producing the largest concentration of methane seen over the United States.


Albuquerque issues draft Bosque environmental assessment

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By Richard Barish, Bosque Issues Chair, January 15, 2015

In response to criticism from the Sierra Club and others that the City of Albuquerque was not looking at the potential environmental impacts of its proposed projects in the Bosque, the City agreed to delay implementation of its Bosque project and conduct baseline environmental monitoring. The monitoring was carried out by a private contractor, SWCA, over a period of about a year, ending in the late summer.


Legislation for wildlife

Coyote Trapped

By Mary Katherine Ray, Chapter Wildlife Chair, January 14, 2015

Trapping season has begun again in New Mexico. It is a winter pastime because that is when the fur of animals like bobcats, foxes and coyotes is thickest and worth the most money.


Oil pipeline threatens Chaco area

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A new oil pipeline that would quadruple oil production in New Mexico's San Juan Basin threatens the internationally recognized Chaco Cultural area and the Lybrook Badlands wilderness.

Please tell the BLM to reject the Piñon Oil Pipeline!

Denver-based SaddleButte LLC has applied to the Bureau of Land Management for a permit to build the 130-mile Piñon Oil Pipeline that would cut between Chaco National Historical Park and outlier Pueblo Pintado from Lybrook down to I-40.


Tell the PRC: A coal mine would be a disastrous investment for PNM

Coal - San Juan

December 20, 2014

PNM appears to be placing all its bets on climate-killing coal.

In addition to its request for a 12 percent rate hike and a $21-$36 monthly fee for everyone who installs home solar, PNM is still considering buying San Juan Coal Mine in order to prop up the aging and polluting San Juan Generating Station.

The New Mexico Public Regulation Commission is currently reviewing PNM's plans for the future of San Juan Generating Station. Now is the time to tell the PRC you want a clean-energy future, not a gamble on an aging coal mine: http://bit.ly/1wUnE0S


Lobbying workshops

Roundhouse - by Dan Lorimier

Are you wondering how things work at the Roundhouse? Are you concerned about the new composition of the State House of Representatives? Are you worried about legislation that could harm all New Mexicans? Are you looking for a way to help?


Chapter's response to Albuquerque's Bosque Environmental Monitoring Plan

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December 15, 2014

By email, mschmader@cabq.gov, and first class U.S. mail
Dr. Matthew Schmader, City of Albuquerque Open Space Division
P.O. Box 1293, Albuquerque, N.M. 87103
Re: SWCA Environmental Monitoring Plan and Baseline Monitoring Report

Dear Dr. Schmader:


El Paso Group Endorses Franklin Mountains Conservation Petition Calling for Saving Land on Both Sides of the Franklin Mountains

Map of City Owned Land Included in Petition

The Sierra Club El Paso Group has endorsed the Franklin Mountains Conservation Petition calling for Saving land on both sides of the Franklin Mountains. The petition asks the El Paso City Council to pass the following ordinance:


A membership moment – please take a minute to consider your Sierra Club membership

Takota, a Golden Eagle from the El Paso Zoo at the Chihuahuan Desert Fiesta in 2010 by Rick LoBello

I have always admired and respected the Sierra Club. When I worked in the national parks we all heard the story of John Muir and I can really relate to what he said in The Yosemite in 1912… "Everybody needs beauty as well as bread, places to play in and pray in, where nature may heal and give strength to body and soul alike."


How to help wildlife through the human zone

This bobcat kitten was brought to the Wildlife Center from a backyard.

By Katherine Eagleson, Wildlife Center, Española, 06/30/14

In the United States we have done a pretty good job of saving scenic places. A lot of wildlife lives in those places.

But when a drought lingers year after year and depletes food sources, or a wildfire burns the habitat to dirt, or maybe it’s just time for the youngsters to move out, make a life of their own, spread the gene pool, how do we accommodate wild animals’ need to move?

Badly, that’s how we have done it so far. We have not planned well to give wildlife the corridors they need to move safely between habitats. We have also misled the public by giving the impression that wildlife managers can collect wildlife from backyards and parks and homeowners’ association properties and transport them to some wilderness nirvana.


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